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14 07, 2017

Partner Bulletin Week 1

By |July 14th, 2017|Categories: Professional Development, Stories|0 Comments

Thanks to all our suppliers and partners, Clarion UK is having its busiest year, driving sustained growth of over 100 bookings per day with a 24 hour turnaround time and with 98-100% fulfilment.  We have also had three audits from the Ministry of Justice, Department of Education and Department of Work and Pensions.  Now Summer is here, we have time to turn our heads to the Autumn and plans for future growth. 

In order to achieve our vision and dreams, we need to improve the way that we communicate with you and what we ask of you.  We will therefore be sending out on a weekly basis; news about the company, new contracts that we have won, company and contract performance,  training, information about average charges, pay rate increases in some areas, supplier fees changes over the years and how we are using technology to communicate and deliver our services.   We will also be letting you know about what we need from you to ensure that we

  1. Have the best vetted and experienced team and
  2. Have a finance department that runs at full throttle – with money in the bank so that you get paid on time throughout the year. 

We need feedback from yourselves as well and we take it very seriously.  You can contact us through all the normal ways and also through our feedback site here – its’s just 6 easy clicks.  http://www.clarion-uk.com/feedback-form/.

Finally, we will be changing the way we talk about you.  We have all these different terms: 


And, frankly, for a company with clarity at the heart of what we do, we are getting more and more confused and so are our clients.  From now on, when we speak to people, you will be, simply, our partners. As a result of your service, flexibility and professionalism we hope we can take our partnership from one that is good, to one that is best in class.  Thank You and here’s to the future. 

1 06, 2017

Specialist Training Courses for Interpreters Working in Legal Domains | Round II

By |June 1st, 2017|Categories: Legal, Professional Development|0 Comments

Clarion UK are pleased to announce our second series of high quality, specialist training courses for BSL/English interpreters working in legal domains. If you didn’t get a chance to apply when we first conducted this course last year, now you can. This course includes: Interpreting in Police Settings, Interpreting for the Courts and Interpreting for Mental Health Tribunals.

These intensive 2 and 3-day training programmes are aimed at interpreters with at least 3 years post-qualifying experience. Courses are being run in conjunction and with the support of Leicestershire Police, Barristers with a range of experience of working in criminal and family courts and professionals with extensive experience in the mental health field.

The aims of the courses are to;

  • provide interpreters with an understanding of police, court and mental health tribunal procedures and current legislation,
  • help interpreters better understand police and court questioning techniques and styles, and
  • give interpreters an overview of the roles and responsibilities of; the various people involved when working with the police, courts and tribunals.

In the police and court courses interpreters will go through a series of simulated scenarios and exercises and be given feedback on their work from experienced interpreters and others involved in the role-play scenarios.

The course participants will also have an opportunity to look at each other’s work with a view to developing and improving their interpreting skills and strategies.

All of the practical exercises will be video recorded and the course participants will then have a copy of their work for later analysis and reflection.

Court training courses will be provided by a variety of skilled and experienced interpreters led by Byron Campbell. There will be a range of other highly skilled and experienced professionals delivering the training, including barristers who have extensive experience of representing their clients in Court, such as Anne Williams.

In addition DS Emma Gilbert from Leicestershire Police will be working with us on a new Interpreter Police Course.

We will also be delivering Mental Health Tribunal Training in conjunction with St Andrews Hospital in Northampton who will allow us access to parts of the hospital used in a Tribunal situation and input from members of their staff which have many years’ experience of working with the Deaf in this environment.

Dates are as follows:

Topic Dates Venue Cost: 
Courts

Associate training reduced by 33%

21-23 August

Bristol

£300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

TBC

Newcastle Upon Tyne

£300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

Mental Health Tribunals 

TBC

Northampton

£200.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

TBC

SE London

£200.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

 

Deaf Interpreting, Lipspeaking, SSCAT, AIT and Employment Tribunals, Probation and Prisons, Deafblind interpreting are all planned and dates are to be confirmed.

Interpreters wishing to book a place on these courses should apply to Lorna Fairborn lorna@clarion-uk.com at Clarion UK and complete the required application form.  Places are limited on these courses so apply early.

11 05, 2017

New Criteria for Deaf Relays & Interpreting in Courts

By |May 11th, 2017|Categories: Legal, Professional Development, Services, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Clarion are the sole providers of communication services for the Deaf under the Ministry of Justice .  We are committed to using NRCPD registered and qualified providers whenever possible.  However, as no such qualification exists for Deaf Relays, we have decided to establish minimum criteria that includes a skills assessment to ensure the best quality possible. Although we know many Deaf Relays are already qualified with several years of experience, their actual quality and skill of provision has never been measured in relation to working in courts. As a result, we have decided the fairest and most transparent way to begin this process is to assess all deaf people who plan to undertake work under the MoJ contract.
 

The advantage to you the deaf relays are; you will know you have been assessed to high standard, you will be the only ones offered work under the new contract and you know you will only be working with skilled colleagues who have also been assessed to the same high standard.

 

 
Assessments will be held on the following dates:
  • London 3rd June 2017
  • Birmingham 10th June 2017
  • London 17th June 2017
Assessments days will run from 10.00-17.00.  Each assessment will last approximately 2 hours so you’re advised to arrive 15 minutes early. Once registered, you will be given an assessment time. Due to the complexity of it, each assessment requires the input of 3 people and 2 assessors.
  • The cost for the assessment will be £350.

However, we would be happy to accept the payment in two separate installments of £175 each.

Unfortunately, this means that from August 2017, we can not use the services of and Deaf Relay/Interpreters/Translators that have not undertaken an approved training course and successfully completed our Deaf relay assessment.  We will assess all Deaf relay interpreters in June of this year and those successfully completing the assessment will be offered court, tribunal and police work for Clarion. This is a change but we are very much looking forward to the consistency and clearer understanding of skills this will bring between us, Deaf Relays and the MoJ

 
Registration Information:
 
To register, please fill out our application form and send it to lorna@clarion-uk.com with your preferred assessment date.
7 12, 2016

Clarion UK – Our Christmas Present for BSL Interpreters

By |December 7th, 2016|Categories: Legal, Professional Development|0 Comments

A reduction in training fees of 66%.

Christmas is coming and while we all have our thoughts on turkey, nut roasts and stuffing, over on the other side of the festivities lies our flagship legal training course. It takes pride of place in central London, presented by acclaimed trainer and interpreter Byron Campbell and running over three days at the end of January. This course is being run in conjunction with various courts around the country and will include input from a range of legal professionals.
The aims of the course are to:
• provide interpreters with an understanding of court procedures and relevant knowledge in terms of roles of those involved in the court process,
• help interpreters better understand court/barrister questioning techniques and styles,
• give interpreters an opportunity to practice their skills in a ‘live’ situation and get feedback on their work.
Interpreters will go through a series of simulated scenarios and exercises and be given feedback on their work from the court officer/barrister, the deaf ‘defendant/witness’ and an experienced interpreter. The course participants will also have an opportunity to look at each other’s work with a view to developing and improving their interpreting skills and strategies. All of the practical exercises will be video recorded and the course participants will then have a copy of their work for later analysis and reflection. 27 CPD points will be awarded on course completion. For a limited period of time, as a Xmas pressie, we are going to offer this course at a significantly reduced price of £100 instead of £300. This offer is only available if you sign up before the end of the year and spaces are limited and already filling up .
If you would like any more information, please do not hesitate to ask Byron or contact us on 01763 209001 sally@clarion-uk.com or Caroline Butcher on caroline@clarion-uk.com

29 11, 2016

BSL/English Interpreting in Police Stations – Paradigm shifts in training provision

By |November 29th, 2016|Categories: British Sign Language, Legal, Professional Development|0 Comments

Clarion UK held its first ever three day training course on BSL interpreting in Police stations and we waited with baited breath for the outcomes and feedback. This training was done in conjunction with Local Deaf actors, PC Emma Gilbert , Anthony Mitchell and Byron Campbell interpreter trainer and Clare Wade, a criminal defense solicitor.

The course involved the chance to interpret in “almost real situations” having a police sergeant, a Deaf person and a duty solicitor in an actual interview room and victim suites in role play scenarios. The participants were given information on terminology and jargon; which was very well received, as was the ability understand the processes and pressures impacting on the police. Participants said that they gained considerable insight into the challenges of working with interpreters and Deaf people from their point of view. There was also the opportunity for interpreters to be videoed and take clips away. Here are some of the comments from our first cohort of trainees:

“This training was really useful, really valuable being able to practise interviews in an actual police station for real life experience”

“Training is perfect for new and established interpreters”

“fantastic training, all days very valuable”

“The training was excellent”

“ I loved it…exactly what I needed”

Information on future legal  courses can be found here.

26 09, 2016

Specialist Training Courses for Interpreters Working in Legal Domains

By |September 26th, 2016|Categories: Legal, Professional Development|0 Comments

 

 

Clarion UK are pleased to announce a series of high quality, specialist training courses for BSL/English interpreters working in legal domains. Our first series of courses beginning in November will include: Interpreting in Police Settings, Interpreting for the Courts and Interpreting for Mental Health Tribunals.

These intensive 2 and 3-day training programmes are aimed at interpreters with at least 3 years post-qualifying experience. Courses are being run in conjunction and with the support of Leicestershire Police, Barristers with a range of experience of working in criminal and family courts and professionals with extensive experience in the mental health field.

The aims of the courses are to;

  • provide interpreters with an understanding of police, court and mental health tribunal procedures and current legislation,
  • help interpreters better understand police and court questioning techniques and styles, and
  • give interpreters an overview of the roles and responsibilities of; the various people involved when working with the police, courts and tribunals.

In the police and court courses interpreters will go through a series of simulated scenarios and exercises and be given feedback on their work from experienced interpreters and others involved in the role-play scenarios.

The course participants will also have an opportunity to look at each other’s work with a view to developing and improving their interpreting skills and strategies.

All of the practical exercises will be video recorded and the course participants will then have a copy of their work for later analysis and reflection.

Training courses will be provided by a variety of skilled and experienced interpreters including Byron Campbell, Gloria Ogborn, Jemina Napier, Maureen Bergson, Karen Newby and others. There will be a range of other highly skilled and experienced professionals delivering the training as well such as Anne Williams and Clare Wade, both very experienced barristers and DS Emma Gilbert from Leicestershire Police. Dr Sue O’Rourke and Clare Shard will be delivering the Mental Health Tribunal courses and both have several years’ experience in the mental health field.

 

Provisional dates for the courses are as follows;

Topic Dates Venue Cost: 
Police settings

 

Nov 18th-20th Leicestershire £300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

Dec 16th 18th Essex £300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

Jan 27th– 29th Cheshire £300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

Courts

 

30 Nov. 1/2 Dec Nottingham £300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

30/31 Jan, 1 Feb London £300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

20-22 Feb Manchester £300.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

Mental Health Tribunals  12 and 13 Nov South East London £200.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

5 and 6 Dec South East London £200.00

Associate training reduced by 33%

 

2017 Deaf Interpreting, Lipspeaking, SSCAT, AIT and Employment Tribunals, Probation and Prisons, Deafblind interpreting are all planned and dates are to be confirmed.

 

Interpreters wishing to book a place on these courses should apply to Caroline Butcher caroline@clarion-uk.com at Clarion UK and complete the required application form.  Places are limited on these courses so apply early.

14 04, 2016

Accredited Electronic Notetaking course at DCAL

By |April 14th, 2016|Categories: Professional Development, Technology|0 Comments

Open College Network (OCN) London Level 3 awarded

Five consecutive Thursdays: 7th July – 4th August 2016. 9.30am – 4.30pm, Central London Location

Bursary Information

Clarion UK is providing one bursary, covering 50% of the full course fee. Note: UCL Staff and students are not eligible for this bursary. For further information about the bursary please contact Bethany Jamieson. Tel: 01763 209001 Email: bethany.jamieson@clarioncall.net

Did you know?…

  • The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills recently published guidance recommending notetakers providing support to people with disabilities have formal notetaking qualifications.
  • Trained note takers are in short supply and the new guidance will certainly increase demand for trained notetakers
  • Qualified notetakers can earn over £30/hour

Course Summary

The portfolio-based course will train you to document clear, informative notes for students with different disabilities. You will study the context and role of notetakers, the notetaking requirements of students with disabilities and strategies for supporting a range of learning needs. You will learn the key principles of working as an electronic notetaker for deaf and disabled students, which includes disability awareness, the Equality Act and notetaking needs of clients with a variety of disabilities. You will gain valuable insights into the professional issues involved, a mastery of the technical skills employed, whilst acquiring experienced instruction in a recognised notetaking software package.

For further information, please click on the following link – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dcal/study/cpd/electronic_notetaking

This course is delivered in partnership with Note-able Notetakers Limited and supported by Clarion.

NoteAble Notetakers

They are also running an Introduction to Notetaking course – http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dcal/study/cpd/introduction-to-notetaking

 

14 12, 2015

4 Reasons to Give your Staff BSL Training

By |December 14th, 2015|Categories: British Sign Language, Deaf Awareness Training, Professional Development, Sign Language|0 Comments

Do you have Deaf staff who work at your office? Do your staff regularly come into contact with Deaf BSL users?

Here are 4 great reasons to ask Clarion to give your staff BSL training:

  • You can improve access to your business and customer service by giving staff the opportunity to learn BSL. The training will make your staff more confident in interacting better with Deaf people
  • Training can be completely tailored to your own business environment, for example, if you are a GP practice you might want to learn signs that are related to health so your service is accessible to Deaf patients. If you employ Deaf staff you might want your course designed around inclusivity, so everyone feels like a member of the team.
  • You can really improve inclusion in the work place if hearing and Deaf colleagues can communicate with each other. Your staff attending a British Sign Language training course could be recognised as a ‘reasonable adjustment’ under the Equality Act 2010.
  • Learning BSL is a fun and enjoyable experience . One of our customers said “The basic (Sign Language) training provided a good insight into BSL and has given me the confidence to be able to communicate with my Deaf colleague and hold small conversations but also the will to learn more.

Please visit our British Sign Language Training page to learn more about what Clarion can offer you.

5 12, 2014

Clarion Interpreting, BSL users and the Psychiatric Profession: Challenges, Issues and Breakthroughs

By |December 5th, 2014|Categories: British Sign Language, Deaf Community, Professional Development|0 Comments

Come and join Clarion Interpreting Services in Cambridge with consultant forensic psychiatrist, Manjit Gahir from Rampton Hospital and hear him talk on 19th December at 2pm-3.15pm

Are the scales balanced? For Deaf People with additional needs who go through psychiatric services – is equal access possible to achieve? We will be looking at cross cultural views and issues, the challenges for diagnosis and also looking at the assessment of schizophrenia, personality disorders and depression when working with BSL users. Critically, we will be hearing about the role that experienced and registered BSL/English Interpreters can play.

Manjit Gahir is a consultant Forensic Psychiatrist working at Rampton Hospital. Over the last ten years, he has developed expertise in the assessment and treatment of deaf mentally disordered offenders. He runs the only high security deaf unit in the UK at Rampton Hospital and has provided assessments to other secure units and prisons. He is a member of the European Society of Mental Health and Deafness and has lectured in Europe and Canada on the topic of deaf offenders.

He is coming to talk to Clarion Interpreting on the theme of Deaf people with additional mental health needs going through the mental health system and we would love for you to join us at no cost. Tea, coffee and CPD points all provided.

If you would like to attend, please contact us using the form below so we have an idea of numbers. You would be very welcome; it would also be great to see you and have the chance to catch up for Xmas.

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20 11, 2014

Modern Dress Codes for the Modern Interpreter

By |November 20th, 2014|Categories: British Sign Language, Professional Development|0 Comments

“Business Smart”, “Business Casual” “Smart Casual”, “Casual”. Modern Dress Codes for the modern interpreter are all so confusing!

What gets most people sweating is when the words ‘business’ – inferred as being very formal – and ‘casual’ – associated with relaxed nights out with friends – are used in the same breath. This gets our heart rates up as we start assessing the level of casualness that will not be frowned upon while at the same time needing to refrain from hitting the heights of formality found at an English tea party.

So then, what is the sweet spot we seek when it comes to all the phrases above? Let’s take a look at it from bottom up.

Business Smart. What it’s not? Three piece suit with a fob watch. What is hot?

  • A great well-tailored suit or tailored dress (for the women, that is), go with 100% cotton shirts.
  • Stick with conventional solids preferably black.
  • Keep the belt simple, no fancy buckles or colours.
  • Always match your socks with your trouser colour.
  • Well-polished shoes

Business Casual. What it’s not? Ill-fitting shirts, baggy trousers and nondescript jacket. What is hot?

  • Nothing ruins an outfit – whatever the dress code and no matter how expensive the clothes are – like wearing something that doesn’t fit. The first secret to looking smart is sizing correctly.
  • Basically for chaps it means that you can remove your tie.
  • You can’t wear jeans though.
  • A decent pair of trousers plus a long sleeved shirt.
  • Never dress flirty in a work environment, boys.

Women, you can do away with the formal suit and opt co-ordinating separates:

  • Tailored trousers or a skirt teamed with a jacket or shirt.
  • Knitwear such as a cardigan or wrap top would be great with tailored trousers or skirt.
  • Skirts must be of a respectable length.
  • A cap, short or three quarter length sleeve dress is acceptable. Ensure the dress is the appropriate length.
  • You can wear less formal shoes but not trainers or flip flop type sandals. Shoes must have a closed toe.

Casual. What it’s not? Zebra onesies, wetsuits or kilts. What is hot? Jeans, T-shirt. You know the drill.

If in doubt wear black. I know many court interpreters who open their wardrobe to an ocean of plain, black clothes. It makes choosing clothes very easy though. Another trick is to carry around a smart shirt/blouse and if a booking is re-arranged and suitable dress is smarter than you set out, there is something in your bag, ready.